Commentary

The arrested development of Rep. Matt Rosendale

March 14, 2022 5:33 am

U.S. president Donald Trump (L) looks on as Matt Rosendale (R) speaks during a campaign rally at Four Seasons Arena on July 5, 2018 in Great Falls, Montana. President Trump held a campaign style ‘Make America Great Again’ rally in Great Falls, Montana with thousands in attendance. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

The term “arrested development” refers to the stoppage of physical, emotional, or mental development before reaching adulthood. In can also mean a form of mental disorder comprising mental impairment, resulting in a lack of intelligence. Children begin to usually understand the word “no” sometime between the age of six to 14 months. And they often begin to use the word “no” between the ages of three and four as a way to control their own destiny and make their own decisions.

In young children, saying “no” is a normal, healthy way for them to feel as though they have some control. But when an adult says “no” to everything and is always negative, it may be a sign of arrested development. They may be stuck in this three- to four year-old’s emotional phase or, indeed, have more a serious intelligence impairment.

A look at the voting record of Montana Congressman Matt Rosendale suggests that he may be exhibiting signs of this form of arrested development. Here are some of the “no” votes he has cast so far in his first term in Congress:

  • American Rescue Plan – the federal infrastructure bill, which have brought or will bring several billion dollars to Montana for roads, bridges, water-and-sewer systems, irrigation projects, airports, rural high-speed Internet, childcare, rental assistance, vaccines, school aid and other items related to the pandemic.
  • House January 6, 2021, Investigation Committee – House Investigation of the attack on the U.S. Capitol by a pro-Trump mob attempting to reverse the 2020 presidential election results.
  • Postal Service Reform Act of 2022 – a bill that addresses the finances and operations of the U.S. Postal Service.
  • Freedom to Vote: John R. Lewis Act – a bill that merges the John Lewis Voting Rights Act and the Freedom to Vote Act.
  • Protecting Our Democracy Act – a bill that addresses issues involving abuses of presidential powers, checks and balances, accountability, and transparency.
  • Immunization Infrastructure Modernization Act of 2021 – a bill to improve immunization information systems, award grants and cooperative agreements,
  • Build Back Better Act – a bill that provides funding, establishes programs, relating to a broad array of areas, including education, labor, childcare, health care, taxes, immigration, and the environment.
  • PUMP for Nursing Mothers Act – a bill that expands workplace protections for employees with a need to express breast milk.
  • National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022 – a bill that authorizes appropriations for military activities and programs of the Department of Defense.
  • LGBTQ Business Equal Credit Enforcement and Investment Act – a bill that requires financial institutions to report credit application data to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to enforce fair lending laws.
  • Protecting Older Workers Against Discrimination Act of 2021 – a bill that amends the evidentiary standard for age discrimination.
  • For the People Act of 2021 – a bill that expands voter registration and voting access, limits removing voters from voter rolls, among other election-related provisions.
  • Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2021 – a bill that expands labor protections related to employees’ rights to organize and collectively bargain in the workplace.

Since taking office, he has voted “no” seventy-five times, “yes” twice, and passed on voting once. He’s voted no on everything from mother’s milk to support of our troops to protection for the elderly. He even voted against Congressional Gold Medals for officers who defended the assault on the Capitol. Where’s Back the Blue? He also voted against a bill to support the translators of the Afghan war and voted against a bill supporting the people of Ukraine after Russia attacked them.

He has had no legislation that he introduced get to a vote or be passed. We pay this fellow $174,000 a year to represent all of the people of Montana. Perhaps he needs to grow up and vote “yes” for things that help the average citizen and reflect real Montana Values. Otherwise :Why is he there?

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